Making a difference with continuous improvement projects

Posted by Elaine McDevitt on Jul 25, 2016 9:30:00 AM

There has been a lot of activity in our Continuous Improvement Program.  Following are three examples of how co-workers are making our company better by thinking smart and taking time to improve processes, work areas and equipment throughout the company.

ASSEMBLY:

Problem:  Lowering the drive shafts into valve housings of regenerative thermal oxidizers was taking too long.  There had to be two people present; one to operate the crane the other to look under the housing and give directions for the operator.  The drive part, which is quite large in diameter at the top, is small in diameter at the bottom and has to fit tightly into a bottom section.  

 

Solution:  After giving some thought as to how to make the process more efficient, Emilio Guilbe had guides fabricated to help.  The idea is that they would be temporarily screwed into the flange around the top of the valve, help guide the drive part into place and then removed.  If it worked, two other sets would be fabricated to accommodate the different sizes of valves we fabricate.  

 

Result:  There is a big time savings because the guides help the drive part glide right into place with what his now minimal time.  And this time is doubled because two operators now have a lot more time to work on other tasks!

MAINTENANCE:

Problem:  Our Toyota forklift truck was in need of repairs.  But it was also looking pretty nasty!

 forklift_before.jpg

Solution:  While the Truck was torn apart awaiting parts, our Maintenance Team, John Young and John Moyer decided to prime and paint it with leftover paint from other fabrication jobs.

 forklift_after.jpg

Result:  The Fork Truck is not only operating correctly, it has a brand new look to it!  

MACHINE SHOP:

Problem:  While the larger pieces of tooling for the horizontal boring mill were gathered together in one place near the machine, the operator still had to handle them a bit to determine sizes making his choice.

 machine_shop_before.jpg

Solution:  John Gauger built a holder to house the tooling.

 machine_shop_after.jpg

Result:  Not only does the area look more organized, because the operator can see the ends of the tooling much easier, it make choosing the right tooling much faster. It not only takes ingenuity and energy to make these kinds of positive changes, but also pride in their work and in our company … many thanks for a job well done, guys!

The Rose Corporation is a Pennsylvania-based, WBENC-certified small business specializing in the manufacture of custom industrial fabrication, large-scale precision weldments, power generation equipment (including repairs), and more. The Rose Corporation’s most unique strength is our experience with delivery of specialized design expertise, along with an ability to help customers optimize manufacturability, reduce costs, and improve overall product quality.

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